Cities by Night is an ongoing participatory project dealing with women’s perception of the danger in the urban environment.

Paris by Night_Woman | Caucasian | 36 | Italian | Middle class

Paris by Night_Woman | Caucasian | 36 | Italian | Middle class

Women from different background, race and age, are invited to explore the streets of their own city, wandering alone when the sun sets, avoiding to cross the areas where they feel uncomfortable. The result of their walks are several “Cities by Night”: city maps where the dangerous areas are covered with black ink, and the clear areas show a completely different topography. By exploring the city with their bodies, in fact, these “flaneuses” draw a new city, one which borders are not merely geographical but physical, emotional and political. Apparently depicting a merely personal experience, the maps show eventually how not only gender but also shared believes, prejudices and cultural background shape, redefine and contract the urban space and our access to it.

The project, already realized in Amsterdam and Paris and soon in Bologna –IT, and Istanbul, is meant to happen in different cities and several times in the same city, so to offer many perspectives on a same urban context and confront the different results. Although titled in the same way, each “City by Night” will be than different and will have a unique legend carrying few informations about the walker –such as her age, her class, her ethnicity, her provenance, her level of acquaintance with the city. 


“...I’m afraid whenever I can’t see clearly

Paris by Night | folded map

Paris by Night | folded map

 streets full of trees,
shadows, alleys -when they smell like urine.

I’m afraid of the noise of the air being slashed by the arms of someone running behind me.
I’m afraid of wind
of whistling
of unexpected aggressive noises –the clang of a nearby factory.


I’m afraid of silence.”

People participating to the project are given instruction on how to explore the city. the collected data are than given to the artist who transpose them on a map of that city.

 
Amsterdam by Night_Woman | Caucasian | 38 | French | Working Class

Amsterdam by Night_Woman | Caucasian | 38 | French | Working Class

Amsterdam | Galerie PuntWG_Distributing the maps to participate to the project

Amsterdam | Galerie PuntWG_Distributing the maps to participate to the project

   

 

 

In Bologna by Night, curated by Elisa Del Prete and presented as part of Danza Urbana Festival –a Urban Dance&Performance Festival in Bologna, IT–  I opened the project to other women. After a two days workshop held by ethno-semiologist Gaspare Caliri and myself –in which  we shared our common ideas about danger and decided for the notion of  "comfortless" as our key word–  the women were asked  to map the city for me, going out at night privately and individually for the whole duration of the Festival (5 days).

To be part of a Dance context underlined the central role plaid by the body and the physical experience of the space in creating a new topography, and it also gave me the possibility to play with the concepts of visibility and gaze. In fact, since the project requires the women to go out alone –as they would do in their daily life–  no one was ever allowed to see them. Although they were there, they were invisible. 

Their chosen invisibility amplified and plaid with the historical invisibility of women in the public context (unless prostitutes),  their absence in most decision making abouturban policies, andthe lack of (proper and effective) attention and solutions on women abuse. Having their bodies freed from the audience's gaze, the women reclaim their freedom.

While taking notes of the areas they felt uncomfortable about, they also shared their results, day by day and pin after pin, on Freeda –a website where the audience of the festival could virtually follow them.

Doing the project myself,  I sent a nightly report of my own exploration –few lines and a picture that described my intimate experience of the space.

The final maps, one for women and each with her data displayed,  will be shown in an exhibition also curated by Elisa Del Prete later this year.